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St. Vincent - Live At Glastonbury (Full Set).

I uploaded Annie’s full set to Youtube, because it is easier to watch on there/for people outside the UK.

When virtuoso female guitarists appear on the rock radar, they tend to gain the spotlight in the lulls between dominant, malecentric scenes (Britpop, grunge, glam rock), celebrated in isolation as brief, intermittent flashes of brilliance that flare up between the wider, collective scenes. When these women are innovative enough to operate successfully outside a zeitgeist, and gain an audience without the legitimacy and safety of a wider scene, they are seen as ancillary to rock’s larger, holistic pantheon. They are rounded up for “women in rock” trend pieces where “gender is genre”, a rock press narrative that creates a separate, and implicitly lesser, form of rock.
by Charlotte Richardson Andrews, The Guardian, March 2012 [in contrast to this shitty piece right here, two years later]
There is nothing wrong with loving the crap out of everything. Never apologize for your enthusiasm. Never. Ever. Never.
by Ryan Adams
It’s unpacking some of what it means to be a ‘real girl’ and a ‘real boy.’ We get handed down these ideas of gender and sexuality: You’re supposed to be this or that. What happens if you float around the cracks and don’t fit into these narrowly prescribed things? … I believe in gender fluidity and sexual fluidity. … I don’t really identify as anything. I think you can fall in love with anybody. I don’t have anything to hide, but I’d rather the emphasis be on music.
by Annie Clark (St. Vincent) to Rolling Stone on Prince Johnny, gender, and sexuality. (via fuckyeahstvincent)